Danny Fernandes

 

Danny Fernandes joined the faculty at the Graduate School of Applied Informatics, University of Hyogo, Japan in July 2010. His educational background is in Mechanical Engineering and he also has an MBA. He has also worked as an IT consultant in Kenya. He is also a Fulbright scholar. 

One of his great passions is teaching graduate students and supervising their research work. Before joining the faculty at the University of Hyogo, he taught graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, USA for 10 years and also taught at the University of Nairobi for 7 years. His teaching excellence was nationally recognized in 2004 in the U.S  when he received the General Motors Outstanding Distance Learning Faculty Award for the Telecommunications Management class he taught in CMU's MSIT program in 2003. In that year more than 150 instructors from some 15 top research institutions in the United States delivered courses to GM employees. Through semester evaluations and nomination forms, the GM students made the selection for this award. 

He has presented papers at various international conferences and has published in journals such as  Decision Support Systems and Journal of Industrial Economics. He also received the Best Paper Award at the 2001 Americas Conference on Information Systems (ACIS), for his paper  "ServiceNet: An Agent-based framework for one-stop e-government services". His research interests focus on problems and issues that lie at the intersection of people and modern information and communication technologies (ICTs). His recent work in this area includes:

a) Designing and testing theoretical models that can assist the design of more effective websites for users of web-based services

b) Protection of online information privacy:  Development of privacy and security tools and techniques to protect and manage privacy of personal data of people who navigate the modern ubiquitous and heterogeneous networked-communication environments. 

c) Applying machine learning and other techniques on large datasets to better understand how and why people use (or decide to stop using) technologies in their everyday lives. A  particular field of interest here is how people with disabilities interact with ICTs.

He teaches classes in the areas of Telecommunications Management, Computer networks, and, Economics of IT.

He is a member the Association for Computing Machinery, USA.

For more Information:https://sites.google.com/site/pcicts/member-profiles